Snow leopard cubs born at the Zoo

On Monday, May 27, 2019 Monroe County Executive Cheryl Dinolfo & Seneca Park Zoo officials announced that snow leopard Timila gave birth to cubs.

Official statement:

“As a first-time mom, Timila was a bit unsure and delivered one cub in her outdoor habitat and one cub in her maternity den. Timila appears to be caring for the cub that is with her indoors. The other cub, a male who was born in the outdoor habitat, was retrieved by Animal Care staff and brought to the Zoo’s on-site animal hospital. While he appears strong and healthy, this cub will face a difficult road ahead. Over the next few days, Animal Care staff will attempt to return this cub to Timila. In the meantime, Timila will remain in her off-exhibit maternity den with the other cub. Animal Care staff will be monitoring Timila and her cubs closely and we will continue to keep the public updated on their progress.”

UPDATES

June 1, 2019 – Dinolfo announces both cubs are male.

“More exciting news out of our Seneca Park Zoo on this #Caturday! Both newly born snow leopard cubs are male! Our new mom, Timila, is taking care of them very well and both are in excellent health. Stay tuned for more updates about our adorable new additions at the Zoo!”

June 5, 2019 – Zoo announces one male cub has died.

“We have sad news to report regarding the two male snow leopard cubs born to first-time mother Timila at Seneca Park Zoo on Monday, May 27th. The one cub, which required assistance from Animal Care staff immediately after birth but was returned to his mother on the following day, has died.” Click here to read the full statement.

July 9, 2019 – Our snow leopard cub is growing!

Born on May 27th, he is now six weeks old. He surpassed 5 lbs., his teeth have come in, and he received his first set of vaccines! Timila is a great mom and is allowing Animal Health staff to provide necessary supportive care to help make sure the cub continues doing well. Both mom and cub continue to den in the off-exhibit area of the Zoo’s snow leopard habitat. If all continues to go well, we expect them to emerge into the outdoor habitat and be viewable to the public in late-August or early-September!