Asian Common Toad

Asian Spiny Toad

(Duttaphrynus melanostictus)

The Zoo is home to three Asian common toad, also known as spiny toad. This species resides in our Ambassador Animal collection. 

Animal Facts

Diet

Insectivore. Insects, various arthropods, crickets, mealworms, and occasionally pinkies.

Status in The Wild

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List status

This species can be found in temperate, subtropical, and tropical habitats up to 2000 meters (1.24 miles) above sea level. Thier natural range extends Southern China, India, Southeast Asia.

There are no imminent threats to Asian common toad populations. It is sometimes found in the international pet trade but not at levels that constitute a major threat. They are also eaten locally in northern Thailand. Another minor threat would be water pollution having affects on eggs and tadpoles.

Borneo eared frog

Borneo Eared Frog

There are a few Borneo eared frogs at the Zoo that came to us in 2021 from Houston Zoo.

Animal Facts

Diet

The Borneo eared frog eats a diet of insects and other invertebrates, smaller frogs; as tadpoles they eat mainly algae

Status in The Wild

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List status

These frogs are found in the forests and wetlands of Borneo, Indonesia, and Malaysia. These frogs are arboreal and commonly seen clinging to vegetation, a few yards from the ground.

The population is decreasing, but this species is listed as Least Concern due to its wide distribution and tolerance for some degree of habitat modification.  Although the frogs are rarer within some areas of their range, the overall population is also presumed to be large. The principal threat to the species is rapid clear-cutting of lowland tropical rainforest in forest timber concession land and for large-scale oil palm plantations.  The species is also collected for the pet trade.

 

Burmese Python

Burmese Python

(Python bivittatus)

Seneca Park Zoo is home to two Burmese pythons, both males. Garrett and Caulkins, resides inside the Zoo’s Creatures from the River’s Edge building. They were hatched in 2016 right here at Seneca Park Zoo. Their parents were longtime zoo residents Abby and Mr. Slithers.

Animal Facts

Diet

The Burmese python eats appropriately sized mammals, birds and rodents.

Status in The Wild

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List status

The jungles and scrublands of Burma, Malasia and Thailand compose the Burmese python’s habitat.

It has been slaughtered to supply the world leather market, as well as for folk medicines and captured for the pet trade. In recent years, extensive captive breeding has lessened the animals threat but unauthorized release of pet Burmese pythons in the Everglades has introduced an invasive species into a fragile environment.

Fire-Bellied Toad

Fire-Bellied Toad

(Bombina orientalis)

Seneca Park Zoo is home to 10 fire-bellied toads that are a part of the Program Animal collection.

Animal Facts

Diet

Tadpoles survive on algae, fungi, and plants, while the adults eat a variety of invertebrates, including worms, insects, and mollusks.

Status in The Wild

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List status

This species is found in Korea, northeastern China and adjacent parts of Russia.

An introduced population exists near Beijing. This frog is mostly aquatic, inhabiting warm, humid regions at high elevations. They may be found in a variety of different habitats, such as spruce, pine or deciduous forests, river valleys, swampy bush lands, and open meadows. They spend most of their time soaking in shallow pools.

The fire-bellied toad is not currently considered a threatened species.

New Caledonian Crested Gecko

New Caledonian Crested Gecko

(Rhacodactylus ciliatus)

Seneca Park Zoo is home to two crested geckos. Both were born in May 2005, and arrived at the Zoo in 2007. Their names are Crazy-Eye and Hopscotch, and they are a part of the Zoo’s ambassador animal program.

Animal Facts

Diet

The New Caledonian crested gecko feeds on a variety of insects and fruit.

Status in The Wild

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List status

These geckos are native to the island of New Caledonia, in the southeast Pacific, east of Australia.

This species was once thought to be extinct. It was rediscovered in 1994 and is now listed as endangered.

Red Panda

Red Panda

(Fulgens fulgens)

The Zoo is home to two red pandas, a female named Raji and a male named Willie. Born in July 2022, Raji arrived at the Zoo in winter 2023 from the Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse. Willie was born in 2015 at the Greenville Zoo in South Carolina and came to us in 2020 from Zoo Knoxville in Tennessee. Willie is distinctive from Raji based on his predominantly white face, while Raji’s face markings are more red. The red panda habitat is located next to the Animal Hospital.

Animal Facts

Diet

Although technically omnivores, red pandas are primarily herbivores and prefer to feed on bamboo leaves and shoots. They will also eat berries, blossoms, the leaves of other plants, and occasionally bird eggs, insects, and small rodents.

Status in The Wild

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List status

Red pandas are found throughout the Himalayan Mountains, living at altitudes between 5,000 and 15,000 feet.

They prefer cool temperate climates in deciduous and coniferous forests. These forests are vital for red panda survival, since they are an arboreal species.

The biggest threat to this species is deforestation, which eliminates nesting sites and sources of food, and isolates populations into small fragments. They are also poached for their fur, and are becoming increasingly popular in the pet trade.